Martin Rodbell, Ph.D.

Affiliations: 
National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States 
Website:
http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1994/rodbell-autobio.html
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"Martin Rodbell"
Bio:

(1925 - 1998)
The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1994 was awarded jointly to Alfred G. Gilman and Martin Rodbell for their discovery of G-proteins and the role of these proteins in signal transduction in cells

Mean distance: 8.89 (cluster 28)
 
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Publications

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Rodbell M. (1997) The complex regulation of receptor-coupled G-proteins. Advances in Enzyme Regulation. 37: 427-35
Rodbell M. (1996) G proteins: out of the cytoskeletal closet. The Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, New York. 63: 381-6
Coulter S, Jahangeer S, Rodbell M. (1996) [5] Cross-linking of synaptoneurosome G proteins Methods in Neurosciences. 29: 58-63
Rodbell M. (1995) The complex structure and function of G-proteins in cellular communication. Bulletin Et MéMoires De L'AcadéMie Royale De MéDecine De Belgique. 150: 316-9
Rodbell M. (1995) Signal transduction: evolution of an idea. Environmental Health Perspectives. 103: 338-45
Rodbell M. (1995) Nobel Lecture. Signal transduction: evolution of an idea. Bioscience Reports. 15: 117-33
Rodbell M. (1995) Signal transduction: Evolution of an idea (Nobel lecture) Angewandte Chemie - International Edition in English. 34: 1420-1428
Rodbell M. (1994) Bioinformatics: an emerging means of assessing environmental health. Environmental Health Perspectives. 102: 136
Jahangeer S, Rodbell M. (1993) The disaggregation theory of signal transduction revisited: further evidence that G proteins are multimeric and disaggregate to monomers when activated. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 90: 8782-6
Coulter S, Rodbell M. (1992) Heterotrimeric G proteins in synaptoneurosome membranes are crosslinked by p-phenylenedimaleimide, yielding structures comparable in size to crosslinked tubulin and F-actin. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 89: 5842-6
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