Michael M. Kasumovic

Affiliations: 
University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia 
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"Michael Kasumovic"
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Publications

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Blamires SJ, Cerexhe G, White TE, et al. (2019) Spider silk colour covaries with thermal properties but not protein structure. Journal of the Royal Society, Interface. 16: 20190199
Girard MB, Elias DO, Kasumovic MM. (2015) Female preference for multi-modal courtship: multiple signals are important for male mating success in peacock spiders. Proceedings. Biological Sciences / the Royal Society. 282
Kasumovic MM, Kuznekoff JH. (2015) Insights into Sexism: Male Status and Performance Moderates Female-Directed Hostile and Amicable Behaviour. Plos One. 10: e0131613
Kasumovic MM, Jordan LA. (2013) Social factors driving settlement and relocation decisions in a solitary and aggregative spider. The American Naturalist. 182: 532-41
Kasumovic MM, Hall MD, Brooks RC. (2012) The juvenile social environment introduces variation in the choice and expression of sexually selected traits. Ecology and Evolution. 2: 1036-47
Stoltz JA, Andrade MC, Kasumovic MM. (2012) Developmental plasticity in metabolic rates reinforces morphological plasticity in response to social cues of sexual selection. Journal of Insect Physiology. 58: 985-90
Girard MB, Kasumovic MM, Elias DO. (2011) Multi-modal courtship in the peacock spider, Maratus volans (O.P.-Cambridge, 1874). Plos One. 6: e25390
Kasumovic MM, Brooks RC. (2011) It's all who you know: the evolution of socially cued anticipatory plasticity as a mating strategy. The Quarterly Review of Biology. 86: 181-97
Kasumovic MM, Hall MD, Try H, et al. (2011) The importance of listening: juvenile allocation shifts in response to acoustic cues of the social environment. Journal of Evolutionary Biology. 24: 1325-34
Brooks R, Scott IM, Maklakov AA, et al. (2011) National income inequality predicts women's preferences for masculinized faces better than health does. Proceedings. Biological Sciences / the Royal Society. 278: 810-2; discussion 81
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