Devin M. Drown, Ph.D.

Affiliations: 
2010-2014 Biology Indiana University, Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, United States 
 2015- Institute of Arctic Biology University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK, United States 
Area:
Coevolultion, host-parasite interactions
Website:
http://www.devindrown.com/
Google:
"Devin Drown"
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Publications

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Wade MJ, Drown DM. (2016) Nuclear-mitochondrial epistasis: a gene's eye view of genomic conflict. Ecology and Evolution. 6: 6460-6472
Drown DM, Wade MJ. (2014) Runaway coevolution: adaptation to heritable and nonheritable environments. Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution. 68: 3039-46
Drown DM, Zee PC, Brandvain Y, et al. (2013) Evolution of transmission mode in obligate symbionts. Evolutionary Ecology Research. 15: 43-59
Drown DM, Dybdahl MF, Gomulkiewicz R. (2013) Consumer-resource interactions and the evolution of migration. Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution. 67: 3290-304
Drown DM, Zee PC, Brandvain Y, et al. (2013) Evolution of transmission mode in obligate symbionts Evolutionary Ecology Research. 15: 43-59
Drown DM, Preuss KM, Wade MJ. (2012) Evidence of a paucity of genes that interact with the mitochondrion on the X in mammals. Genome Biology and Evolution. 4: 763-8
Dybdahl MF, Drown DM. (2012) Response to comments on "The absence of genotypic diversity in a successful parthenogenetic invader" by Mark Dybdahl and Devin Drown [Biological Invasions 13 (2011), 1663-1672] Biological Invasions. 14: 1647-1649
Drown DM, Levri EP, Dybdahl MF. (2011) Invasive genotypes are opportunistic specialists not general purpose genotypes. Evolutionary Applications. 4: 132-43
Dybdahl MF, Drown DM. (2011) The absence of genotypic diversity in a successful parthenogenetic invader Biological Invasions. 13: 1663-1672
Vigliola L, Doherty PJ, Meekan MG, et al. (2007) Genetic identity determines risk of post-settlement mortality of a marine fish. Ecology. 88: 1263-77
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