Ricardo Gil-da-Costa

Affiliations: 
Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, United States 
Area:
Cognitive Neurosciences (Evolution of Conceptual Representation and Vocal Communication/Language)
Google:
"Ricardo Gil-da-Costa"
Bio:

Ricardo Gil-da-Costa holds a Masters degree in Marine Biology and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences - Cognitive Neurosciences.
In the last 10 years his pursuit of how the mind and brain work led him to behavioral field studies in Africa and Central America and laboratory research from Harvard University to the National Institutes of Health.
Currently, he is a Research Associate at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla CA., where he is developing and using non-invasive brain imaging systems on different species. His research has been distinguished with multiple awards, such as the Donald B. Lindsley Prize for Behavioral Neuroscience, and has contributed seminal findings on the evolutionary and neural foundations of human cognition and language.

Cross-listing: Neurotree

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Publications

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Gil-da-Costa R, Stoner GR, Fung R, et al. (2013) Nonhuman primate model of schizophrenia using a noninvasive EEG method. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 110: 15425-30
Faustino-Rocha AI, Silva A, Gabriel J, et al. (2013) Ultrasonographic, thermographic and histologic evaluation of MNU-induced mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy = BioméDecine & PharmacothéRapie. 67: 771-6
Simões MJ, Gärtner A, Shirosaki Y, et al. (2011) In vitro and in vivo chitosan membranes testing for peripheral nerve reconstruction. Acta MéDica Portuguesa. 24: 43-52
Lauterbach M, da Costa RG, Leal G, et al. (2010) Recovering from acquired childhood aphasia (ACA)--20 years later, learning about the neuroplasticity of language. Behavioural Neurology. 23: 195-7
Gil-da-Costa R, Hauser MD. (2006) Vervet monkeys and humans show brain asymmetries for processing conspecific vocalizations, but with opposite patterns of laterality. Proceedings. Biological Sciences / the Royal Society. 273: 2313-8
Gil-da-Costa R, Martin A, Lopes MA, et al. (2006) Species-specific calls activate homologs of Broca's and Wernicke's areas in the macaque. Nature Neuroscience. 9: 1064-70
Gil-da-Costa R, Braun A, Martin A. (2006) Using PET H2O15 brain imaging to study the functional-anatomical correlates of non-human primate communication. Methods (San Diego, Calif.). 38: 221-6
Gil-da-Costa R, Braun A, Lopes M, et al. (2004) Toward an evolutionary perspective on conceptual representation: species-specific calls activate visual and affective processing systems in the macaque. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 101: 17516-21
Gil-da-Costa R, Palleroni A, Hauser MD, et al. (2003) Rapid acquisition of an alarm response by a neotropical primate to a newly introduced avian predator. Proceedings. Biological Sciences / the Royal Society. 270: 605-10
Miller CT, Miller J, Gil-Da-Costa R, et al. (2001) Selective phonotaxis by cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) Behaviour. 138: 811-826
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