Gabrielle Kardon

Affiliations: 
Human Genetics University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 
Area:
Molecular Biology, Cell Biology
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"Gabrielle Kardon"
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Publications

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Kikani CK, Wu X, Paul L, et al. (2016) Pask integrates hormonal signaling with histone modification via Wdr5 phosphorylation to drive myogenesis. Elife. 5
Domyan ET, Kronenberg Z, Infante CR, et al. (2016) Molecular shifts in limb identity underlie development of feathered feet in two domestic avian species. Elife. 5
Pawlikowski B, Pulliam C, Betta ND, et al. (2015) Pervasive satellite cell contribution to uninjured adult muscle fibers. Skeletal Muscle. 5: 42
Nogueira JM, Hawrot K, Sharpe C, et al. (2015) The emergence of Pax7-expressing muscle stem cells during vertebrate head muscle development. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience. 7: 62
Keefe AC, Lawson JA, Flygare SD, et al. (2015) Muscle stem cells contribute to myofibres in sedentary adult mice. Nature Communications. 6: 7087
Merrell AJ, Ellis BJ, Fox ZD, et al. (2015) Muscle connective tissue controls development of the diaphragm and is a source of congenital diaphragmatic hernias. Nature Genetics. 47: 496-504
Murphy MM, Keefe AC, Lawson JA, et al. (2014) Transiently active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not required but must be silenced for stem cell function during muscle regeneration. Stem Cell Reports. 3: 475-88
Lours-Calet C, Alvares LE, El-Hanfy AS, et al. (2014) Evolutionarily conserved morphogenetic movements at the vertebrate head-trunk interface coordinate the transport and assembly of hypopharyngeal structures. Developmental Biology. 390: 231-46
Rohatgi A, Corbo JC, Monte K, et al. (2014) Infection of myofibers contributes to increased pathogenicity during infection with an epidemic strain of chikungunya virus. Journal of Virology. 88: 2414-25
Merrell AJ, Kardon G. (2013) Development of the diaphragm -- a skeletal muscle essential for mammalian respiration. The Febs Journal. 280: 4026-35
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