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Milton Rosenau

Affiliations: 
Preventative Medicine and Hygiene Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States 
Area:
Pneumonia, Vaccines, Public Health, Pasteurization
Website:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4840b1.htm
Google:
"Milton Rosenau"
Bio:

1869-1946.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1625371/?page=1
https://ihm.nlm.nih.gov/luna/servlet/view/search/what/Portraits?q=Rosenau%201869
https://books.google.com/books?id=8Q4-AQAAMAAJ
Professor Milton Joseph Rosenau is a sanitarian of high repute, who was born in Philadelphia January 1, 1869, and was educated in the high schools of that city. He received his M. D. in the University of Pennsylvania in 1889 and pursued his post-graduate studies in the Hygienische Institute of Berlin in 1892-3; L'Institut Pasteur, Paris, 1900; Pathologisches Institut, Vienna, 1900. He saw public service as surgeon of the Public Health and Marine Hospital Service from 1890 to 1909, and was director of the Hygienic Laboratory of that institution from 1899 to 1909. He has been professor of preventive medicine and hygiene of the Harvard Medical School since October 1, 1909. He was director of the School for Health Officers at Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1913, a member of the Massachusetts Board of Health from 1912 to 1914; director of the Anti-toxin and Vaccine Laboratory in 1914. From 1895 to 1898 he was a quarantine officer at San Francisco, and in 1900 was a delegate of the United States to the Tenth International Congress of Hygiene and Demography, and the Thirteenth International Congress of Medicine and Surgery at Paris in the same year. He was a member of the International Commission for the Revision of Nomenclature of the Causes of Death at Paris in 1900, and was sanitary expert of the Second Pan-American Conference at the City of Mexico in 1901. He was awarded a gold medal by the American Medical Society for service to humanity in 1912-13.
Professor at Harvard who developed a pneumococcal vaccine. He was also instrumental in improving milk pasteurization in the 1910s and was a leading voice in US public health and epidemiology, writing a classic textbook on the subject of public health in 1913. He established the MIT school for Health Officers. He became the Dean of the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina in 1936.
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