William S. Helton, Ph.D.

Affiliations: 
University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 
Area:
vigilance
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"William Helton"

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Joel S. Warm grad student 2002 University of Cincinnati
 (Effects of signal salience and noise on performance and stress in an abbreviated vigil.)
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Publications

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Buckley RJ, Helton WS, Innes CR, et al. (2016) Attention lapses and behavioural microsleeps during tracking, psychomotor vigilance, and dual tasks. Consciousness and Cognition. 45: 174-183
Wilson KM, de Joux NR, Finkbeiner KM, et al. (2016) The effect of task-relevant and irrelevant anxiety-provoking stimuli on response inhibition. Consciousness and Cognition. 42: 358-365
Head J, Helton WS. (2016) The troubling science of neurophenomenology. Experimental Brain Research
Wilson KM, Head J, de Joux NR, et al. (2015) Friendly Fire and the Sustained Attention to Response Task. Human Factors
Epling SL, Russell PN, Helton WS. (2015) A new semantic vigilance task: vigilance decrement, workload, and sensitivity to dual-task costs. Experimental Brain Research
de Joux NR, Wilson K, Russell PN, et al. (2015) The effects of a transition between local and global processing on vigilance performance. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 37: 888-98
de Joux NR, Wilson K, Russell PN, et al. (2015) The configural properties of task stimuli do influence vigilance performance. Experimental Brain Research
Wilson KM, Russell PN, Helton WS. (2015) Spider stimuli improve response inhibition. Consciousness and Cognition. 33: 406-13
Finkbeiner KM, Wilson KM, Russell PN, et al. (2015) The effects of warning cues and attention-capturing stimuli on the sustained attention to response task. Experimental Brain Research. 233: 1061-8
Helton WS, Russell PN. (2015) Rest is best: the role of rest and task interruptions on vigilance. Cognition. 134: 165-73
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