Ruth J. Tincoff, Ph.D.

Affiliations: 
Psychology Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, United States 
Area:
Early language development, word comprehension
Website:
http://www.bucknell.edu/x44069.xml
Google:
"Ruth Tincoff"
Cross-listing: PsychTree - Neurotree - CSD Tree

Parents

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Rebecca Treiman research assistant 1992-1995 Wayne State
Peter W. Jusczyk grad student 1996-2001 Johns Hopkins
 (Infants' attention to phonemic and nonphonemic vocalizations and its role in word learning.)
Marc David Hauser post-doc 2001-2004 Harvard
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Publications

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Tincoff R, Jusczyk PW. (2012) Six-Month-Olds Comprehend Words That Refer to Parts of the Body Infancy. 17: 432-444
Tincoff R, Jusczyk PW. (1999) Some beginnings of word comprehension in 6-month-olds Psychological Science. 10: 172-175
Treiman R, Tincoff R, Rodriguez K, et al. (1998) The foundations of literacy: learning the sounds of letters. Child Development. 69: 1524-40
Treiman R, Broderick V, Tincoff R, et al. (1998) Children's phonological awareness: confusions between phonemes that differ only in voicing. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 68: 3-21
Treiman R, Tincoff R. (1997) The Fragility of the Alphabetic Principle: Children's Knowledge of Letter Names Can Cause Them to Spell Syllabically Rather Than Alphabetically Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 64: 425-51
Treiman R, Tincoff R, Richmond-Welty ED. (1997) Beyond zebra: Preschoolers' knowledge about letters Applied Psycholinguistics. 18: 391-409
Treiman R, Goswami U, Tincoff R, et al. (1997) Effects of Dialect on American and British Children's Spelling Child Development. 68: 229-245
Treiman R, Tincoff R, Richmond-Welty ED. (1996) Letter names help children to connect print and speech Developmental Psychology. 32: 505-514
Treiman R, Berch D, Tincoff R, et al. (1993) Phonology and spelling: the case of syllabic consonants. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. 56: 267-90
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